Applications of Neuroscience Findings to Addictions Treatment

The article annotated and excerpted below, published in 2013, offers a conceptual framework through which to apply the findings of neuroscience to addictions treatment. It may be explosively important. Translating its offerings into practical applications will be difficult. The article is lengthy, written in highly technical language, weighs in at 9,300+ words, and cites 182 sources.

My intention is to attempt, however, to do just that. The work by Eric Garland, et al. – new research funding was just announced 9/6/16 –  could have weighty implications for individuals with substance use disorders (SUDs) and for SUD treatment professionals. My intention is to continue writing about addiction and addictions treatment as simply and directly as I can.

To that end, I have excerpted, annotated, added explanatory links to, and re-formatted the conclusion from Mindfulness Training Targets Neurocognitive Mechanisms of Addiction at the Attention-Appraisal-Emotion Interface and intend to link to this post from other writings.

We offer the following speculative, hypothetical account [demonstrating the conceptual framework described in this paper that applies findings of neuroscience to addictions treatment] based on our clinical and research experience using MBIs [mindfulness-based interventions] to treat persons diagnosed with substance use disorders.

When a recovering addict with a history of using drugs to cope with negative emotions encounters a cue associated with past drug-use episodes while in the context of a stressful environment (e.g., walking past a bar after getting in an argument with a work supervisor), this encounter may activate cortico-limbic-striatal circuits subserving drug-use action schemas. [In other words, the encounter may activate brain structures related to feelings, thoughts and behaviors associated with drug use. The authors write, “The urge to seek intoxication from addictive substances is driven, in part, by reactivity to substance-related stimuli [cues] which have been conferred incentive salience [priority importance], and is magnified by negative affective states.” The authors define “drug-use schemas” as “memory systems that drive drug seeking and drug use through automatized sequences of stimulus-bound, context-dependent behavior.”].

After completing a course in mindfulness training, the addict may become more aware of the automatic addictive habit as it is activated, allowing for top-down regulation of the precipitating negative emotional state and the bottom-up [brain structured-based reactivity] appetitive urge. [“Top-down regulation” is not to be confused with “willpower” or  “suppression” which, according to neuroimaging research, actually results in “hypoactivation in cognitive control circuits.” Attempts to suppress urges, paradoxically, result in 1) increased urges, 2) decreased resilience with regard to emotionally stressful events which is correlated with return to use, and 3) depletion of cognitive resources, thus increasing the likelihood of a return to automatic behavior to use vs. conscious behavior to abstain.]

Specifically, the individual may engage in mindful breathing to first disengage from and then restructure negative cognitive appraisals, thereby reducing limbic (e.g., amygdala) activity, autonomic reactivity, and dysphoric emotions related to the stressor. Concurrently, the individual may become aware of when his attention has been automatically captured by the sight of people drinking in the window of the bar, and, through formal mindfulness practice, activate fronto-parietal mediated attentional networks to disengage and shift focus onto the neutral sensation of respiration.

During this process, as sensations of craving arise, the individual may engage in metacognitive [the ability to become aware of, and direct, one’s thoughts] monitoring of these sensations, and in so doing, facilitate prefrontal down-regulation of limbic-striatal activation. [Author Maia Szalavitz uses the metaphor of a “volume control” to explain a person’s ability to up-regulate or down-regulate his or her own inner state.] As mindfulness of craving is sustained over time without drug-use, the sensations of craving may abate, promoting extinction learning to weaken associative linkages between conditioned addiction-related stimuli and the attendant conditioned appetitive response. [If “appetite” for drinking or using is present, but is not satiated with the anticipated reward, the tie between use and the reward lessens over time.]

Once working memory has been cleared of active representations of substance use, the individual may shift attention to savor non-drug related rewards, such as the sense of accomplishment that may arise from successfully resisting the temptation to drink (i.e., self-efficacy), appreciating the beauty of the sunset on the walk home without being clouded by inebriation, or the comforting touch of a loved one upon returning home safe and sober. [“Savoring” is defined by the authors as “selective attention to positive experience.”]

Through repeated practice of regulating addictive responses and extracting pleasure from life in the absence of substance use, the individual may re-establish healthy dopaminergic tone [to replace atrophy resulting from substance use] and foster neuroplasticity in brain areas subserving increased dispositional mindfulness. [“Dispositional mindfulness” is defined as awareness of, and attention to, what one is feeling and thinking in the moment.]

Ultimately, mindfulness may facilitate a novel, adaptive response to the canonical “people, places, and things” that tend to elicit addictive behavior as a scripted, habitual reaction. In so doing, the practice of mindfulness may attenuate [reduce the power of] stress reactivity and suppression while disrupting addictive automaticity, resulting in an increased ability to regulate and recover from addictive urges.

Posts that link to this post:

  • Forthcoming

Speak Your Mind

*